• 1

    CMC Mercedes-Benz Dirty Hero Combo

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    • CMC 1955 Mercedes-Benz Blue Wonder + Dirty Hero Edition 300 SLR
    • Limited Edition 1000 PCS
    • SKU: M-163

    With this limited combo package, we’re introducing a 1955 Le Mans version of the Mercedes-Benz Race Car Transporter AKA The Blue Wonder and a Dirty Hero’s edition of the Mercedes-Benz SLR Silver Arrow. The Silver arrow is the very same #701 driven by Karl Kling.

    This combo is a scene captured from a RIDE HOME FROM A RACE. The SLR is painted to look as if it has just driven off the track and onto the truck.  


  • M-193 1

    1:18 CMC – 1952 Jaguar C-Type XKC 023 (current state of the model)

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    • Limited Edition of 1500 pieces world-wide
    • High quality Diecast, crafted in excellent detail by CMC
    • Item #M-193

     

    History

    The Jaguar C-Type – the sports car icon of the early fifties.

    The C-Type developed for use in motorsport from the XK120 was completely new except for the optimized engine. Jaguar won the overall victory in Le Mans twice with the C-Type. Between 1952 and 1955, racing teams with the C-Type won many (class) victories in national and international races. 53 copies of the C-Type were made in Coventry, including four lightweight chassis.

    CMC has studied Dr. Jenny’s C-Type (XKC 023) meticulously. The result is a CMC-made miniature highlighting the impressive charisma and sporty dynamics of the original.

     

    Following information courtesy of CMC:

     

    In his or her wildest dream, every collector hopes to be lucky enough to pull a car out of the barn in a rusty and dusty condition, but of so much importance that it would astonish the professional world. This was what happened to Dr. Christian J. Jenny and his C-Type XKC 023.Chassis XKC 023 was first delivered to Charles Hornburg, Jaguar’s US West Coast importer in late 1952, and it was directly transferred to Joe Henderson, a Jaguar dealer in Seattle.

     

    In August 1953, the car took part in a race for the first time — the Seattle Seafair 100-mile race, and it was driven by Bill Pollack and Jack Douglas. The latter was a comedy writer and television producer, well-known for his close relationship with Hollywood celebrities, including Mitzi Gaynor, leading star of “South Pacific”. Jack Douglas became the first owner of the sleek, fast XKC 023, and he took every opportunity to show off his vehicle and girlfriend. Also, racing was in his blood, so the C-type was frequently and successfully used in local racing events. After an accident, in which XKC 023 took considerable damage on the body side, the interest of the amateur racing driver in his C-Type dwindled.

     

    The vehicle remained on the US West Coast. In 1962 it came into the possession of Frank Schierenbeck, owner of a repair shop for European sports cars. With him, the C-type stayed until 1997, but knowledge about its whereabouts had faded into obscurity from the mid-sixties. Search for the missing Chassis XKC 023 began in 1986, and the car was found in 1997, albeit in a state of disassembly. In November 2000, XKC 023 was put together once more. Hardly completely restored, it participated in the Mille Miglia Storica 2001 with Jenny/Werdenberg at the wheel. Two years later, Dr. Jenny took XKC 023 to the celebrations in honour of the C-Type win at Le Mans 1951. In May 2006, the vehicle received the coveted FIA heritage certificate.

     

    Model Description

    • Metal precision model hand-built from more than 1,150 parts
    • Flip-open and lockable engine hood
    • Realistic replica of the straight six engine complete with encircling components, pipes and cabling
    • Metal exhaust pipes
    • Triangular front axle with wishbones, hydraulic shock absorbers, longitudinal
      torsion bar suspension, all made of metal
    • Rigid rear axle with transverse torsion bar suspension, hydraulic shock absorbers, longitudinal links, all made of metal
    • Radiator grille hand-made of stainless steel
    • Detailed replication of the cooling system
      • Detailed fuel and oil circulation
    • Authentically-replicated hinged fuel cap
    • Driver's door openable on realistic-looking hinges
    • Upholstered leather-covered driver and passenger seats
    • Perfectly crafted wheels with stainless-steel spokes and nipples on alloy rims
    • Screw-on central locking nuts with right-/left-handed threads
    • Elegant and brilliant finish in original colour
    • Starting numbers printed with the elaborate tampon printing method

    Special feature as accessory: Booster trolley with separate assist start device

     

    Specifications of Real Car

    • Sports car built on a tubular frame
    • Body shell made of extra thin alloy sheet metal
    • 3.4-litre 6-cylinder in-line-engine
    • Two valves per cylinder controlled by two overhead camshafts
    • Dry sump oil lubrication
    • Mixture preparation with two SU 2”-carburettors type H8/9
    • Coil/ capacitor ignition, one plug per cylinder
    • Four-speed manual gearbox mounted to the engine

     

    Maximum output:  200 HP at 5,800 rpm

    Displacement:        3.442 cc

    Bore x Stroke        83 x 106 mm

    Top speed:            230 Km/h (depending on ratio)

    Wheelbase:            2.438 mm

    Total length:          3.988 mm

    Total width:          1.638 mm

    Track front/rear:    1.295 / 1.295 mm

    Total height:          1. 081 mm

    Curb weight:         970 kg (2102 lb.)


  • M-194 1

    1:18 CMC – 1953 Jaguar C-Type 24H France – Laurent/Tornaco #20

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    • Limited to only 100 pieces WORLD WIDE
    • 1:18 Scale Model Crafted in Diecast Metal
    • Produced in usual high quality by CMC
    • Item #M-183

     

    History

    From the beginning the long-distance classic was the main target for Jaguar, they were aware of the marketing effect of a success in Le Mans. As backup for the three cars Jaguar factory team, Ecurie Francorchamps, who was founded the year before, came to Le Mans and enjoyed the same factory management as the Lightweight C-Types. The impressive result of the two drivers de Tornaco and Laurent in the almost standard C-Type was a ninth overall at the finish. CMC therefore decided to develop this in terms of motor sports and colour scheme interesting variant. The result is a miniature of impressive charisma and sporty dynamics.

     

    Following information courtesy of CMC:

    Ecurie Francorchamps was founded in 1952 by Jacques Swaters. The Belgian team took part in several Formula 1 races from 1952 to 54, but the only victory it scored was at the 1956 Avus race, a Non-World Cup Grand Prix, with the team owner at the wheel. Ecurie Francorchamps also contested in sports car racing until 1978, campaigning Ferrari race cars. But its beginning can be found in the use of Jaguars. It was 1953 when the Belgian team took part in the Jaguar factory entry at Le Mans. Impressed by their ninth-place finish there, Jaguar boss Lyons sent the Belgians to the remaining races of the season at the Spa and Nürburgring. Ecurie Francorchamps competed with Laurent and Swaters at the Spa 24 Hours in July, but suffered an engine failure that caused early retirement. This happened to the Belgians again in the Eifel race at the end of August: retirement compelled by engine damage.

     

    In the wake of this race, Chassis XKC 047 was sent back to Jaguar Cars Ltd. in Coventry for a new engine with a Weber carburetor system and a modified rear suspension of the Lightweight model. This done, the C-type XKC 047 was handed over to Dunlop as a test and development vehicle. Later, XKC 047 resumed racing until 1959. Starting from 1963, it remained in the possession of one family for more than half a century. It was the cornerstone of the significant Jaguar collection by Guy Griffith in southern England. In 2016, Chassis XKC 047 was sold at a Bonham auction in Monaco for 7.2 million euros – unrestored and totally authentic.

     

    Ecurie Francorchamps returned to compete in the 1954 season with a Jaguar C-Type (XKC 011) that was rebuilt and fitted with Weber carburetors. It was successful once more: fourth place at Le Mans, third place at the 12 Hours of Reims, and seventh place at Tourist Trophy.

     

    Model Description

    • Metal precision model hand-built from 1,162 parts
    • Flip-open and lockable engine hood
    • Realistic replica of the straight six engine complete with encircling components, pipes and cabling
    • Metal exhaust pipes
    • Triangular front axle with wishbones, hydraulic shock absorbers, longitudinal torsion bar suspension, all made of metal
    • Rigid rear axle with transverse torsion bar suspension, hydraulic shock absorbers, longitudinal links, all made of metal
    • Radiator grille hand-made of stainless steel
    • Detailed replication of the cooling system
    • Detailed fuel and oil circulation
    • Authentically-replicated hinged fuel cap
    • Driver's door openable on realistic-looking hinges
    • Upholstered leather-covered driver and passenger seats
    • Perfectly crafted wheels with stainless-steel spokes and nipples on alloy rims
    • Screw-on central locking nuts with right-/left-handed threads
    • Elegant and brilliant finish in original colour
    • Starting numbers printed with the elaborate tampon printing method

     

    Technical Data (Original Vehicle)

    • Sports car built on a tubular frame
    • Body shell made of extra thin alloy sheet metal
    • 4-litre 6-cylinder in-line-engine
    • Two valves per cylinder controlled by two overhead camshafts
    • Dry sump oil lubrication
    • Mixture preparation with two SU 2”-carburettors type H8/9
    • Coil/ capacitor ignition, one plug per cylinder
    • Four-speed manual gearbox mounted to the engine

     

    Maximum output:   200 HP at 5,800 rpm

    Displacement:         3.442 cc

    Bore x Stroke          83 x 106 mm

    Top speed:               230 Km/h (depending on ratio)

    Wheelbase:             2.438 mm

    Total length:            3.988 mm

    Total width:              1.638 mm

    Track front/rear:      1.295 / 1.295 mm

    Total height:            1.081 mm

    Curb weight:           970 kg (2102 lb.)


  • M-183 1

    1:18 CMC – 1956 Ferrari D50 GP Italy Collins/Fangio – #26

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    • Item no.: M-183
    • Limited Edition of 1000 pieces Worldwide
    • Produced in Diecast Metal
    • All Images courtesy of CMC, as per the CMC website

     

    The 1956 GP of Italy is a powerful reminder of the sporting spirit shown by Peter Collins in an unprecedented generous act that has gone down in Formula 1 history. As one of the topmost contenders for the World Drivers’ Championship title, Collins renounced his own pursuit when he let Fangio take over his #26 car in the middle of the Monza race. His selfless act enabled Fangio to finish the race as runner-up, thus winning the World Drivers’ Championship for a fourth time.

     

    About

    The Grand Prix of Italy 1956 took place on September 1, 1956 at the Autodromo Nazionale Monza. It was the eighth race of the season as well as the last competition for the decision of the 1956 automobile world championship.

    The candidates for this title were Juan Manuel Fangio and Peter Collins, both driving a Ferrari D50, and Jean Behra driving a Maserati. It was a touch-and-go situation: if Fangio were to miss this race, both Peter Collins and Jean Behra would stand a chance to win the World Championship title. However, in order for either of them to be crowned with the title, winning the fastest lap time, which carried a point in 1956, would also be necessary in addition to the race itself.

    From Ferrari, six D50s were sent to this final race of the season. Four were meant for their regular drivers: Fangio, Collins, Engenio Castellotti and Alfonso de Portago. Cars five and six were put to use by Luigi Musso and Wolfgang Graf Berghe von Trips, a German driver who would have his first Formula 1 race in this season’s finale. Maserati also dispatched six cars to the race, with such outstanding drivers on its team: Stirling Moss, Jean Behr, Luigi Villoresi and Paco Godia. As for the non-Italian racing teams, there were the British Vanwall with Piero Taruffi, Harry Schell and Maurice Trintignant at the wheels of its fleet, and the team Connaught with three vehicles but only one commendable performance by Ron Flockhart during the race. For the last time, the French team Gordini also showed up, but its chances for a front seat turned out to be minimal.

    The Monza race event represented a climax of the season. Contestants had to complete 50 laps for a total distance of 500 km. It took a combination of good driving skills, highest concentration, fine physique, clever racing strategies and a powerful and reliable car to put one in the front.

    It became apparent in practice that Ferrari was likely to win. Fongio won pole position by eight-tenths of a second ahead of his teammate Castellotti, who finished second. Luigi Musso took the third place. The Vanwall driver Taruffi came in fourth. Only in position five did Maserati‘s trident emblem get to shine because of the efforts of its topmost driver Jean Behra. Stirling Moss, who still had hopes of the runner-up title, finished sixth, right in front of Ferrari driver Collins.

    The subsequent course of racing was nothing short of being dramatic. It featured exciting duels as well as an unprecedented demonstration of human generosity and lofty spirit. As was so often the case, Fangio got off to a bad start in pole position. Castellotti and Musso got into the front, but impetuous driving soon caused them to stop for tire changes in the pit, thus giving away their lead. In the fourth round, Stirling Moss surpassed Fangio and took over the lead until the tenth round. Surprisingly Harry Schell, the Vanwall driver, got into the front on lap eleven, but one lap later, he handed the top spot back to Stirling Moss, who was able to maintain the lead till lap 45.

    In the middle of heated racing, things happened that would impact the results of competition for the World Championship of Drivers. In lap 22, Jean Behra retired with a faulty ignition system. Driving a D50 with starting number 22, Fangio had to make a pit-stop because of a broken handle bar after lap 31. However, once the car was fixed, it was not Fangio but Castellotti who drove it to keep on with the race. A pit decision had been made that Fangio should continue his title competition in Luigi Musso’s car, instead. However, Musso ignored the order, leaving Fangio without a car. Fangio knew that his teammate Collins was only one victory and one fastest lap away from the title. He basically gave up any hopes.

    This was when Peter Collins, whose Ferrari was wearing starting number 26, drove into the pit to have his tires checked. What happened then and there has become a well-remembered episode in racing history. On the spur of a selfless decision that could have only been inspired by an unprecedented sporting spirit, Collins handed over his car to Fangio, an older colleague as much as an opponent.
    Collins was the only one in Formula 1 history to have voluntarily and selflessly passed on to a colleague the opportunity to win the world championship title. To justify such a decision, Collins might have told himself that he was still young and had many chances lying ahead. Unfortunately, this calculation did not work out. Two years later, he died of an accident on the Nürburgring circuit where the 1958 German Grand Prix was held.

    Back to the 1956 Monza GP, the race went on. With five laps left to go, Moss was ahead of Musso and Fangio, who was riding in Collins‘ # 26 car. But he ran out of fuel and got stranded in the middle of nowhere for refuelling. This is when another selfless deed unfolded before the spectators. Driving a private Maserati, Luigi Piotti docked behind the rear end of Moss‘ Maserati, pushing Moss and his car to the Maserati box.

    Thanks to this rescuing effort, Moss was able to resume racing and overtake Fangio from behind. For two laps, Musso was in the lead, but as bad luck would have it, he broke the handlebar and had to retire with a major victory so close in sight!

    Stirling Moss took over the lead again and won the race six seconds ahead of Fangio, who shared the points with Collins. With his share of these points, Fangio became the driver world champion of the year for a fourth time.

    The 1956 Monza podium was not complete without Ron Flockhart, who raced for the Connaught Engineering team and finished third, an unprecedented success for his Connaught Type B-Alta. Here is the final list:

    1st: Stirling Moss in Maserati 250F

    2nd: J.M. Fangio / Peter Collins in Ferrari D50

    3rd: Ron Flockhart in Connaught-Alta

     

     

    Model Description

    • Metal precision model hand-built from 1379 parts
    • Detachable and lockable engine hood
    • Flip-open ventilation lid for the driver´s footwell
    • Detail-exact replication of the V8 engine with accessories, pipes and cabling
    • Bundled exhaust pipes made of metal
    • Triangular front axle with shock absorbers and transverse leaf spring, all made of metal
    • Rear suspension with De-Dion-tube, transverse leaf spring, pushrods and friction dampers, all made of metal
    • Hand-crafted stainless steel grille
    • Oil cooler installed in front of the radiator
    • Detailed replication of fuel and oil circulation as well as the cooling system,
    • Hinged flip-open fuel and oil filler caps
    • Upholstered, leather-covered driver’s seat and head-rest
    • Amazingly realistic and perfectly crafted wheels with stainless-steel spokes and nipples mounted on an alloy rim
    • Authentically-replicated central locking nuts with right-/left-handed threads
    • Elegant finish by hand in the original hue and colour

     

    Special feature as accessory: Booster trolley with separate assist start device

     

    Real Car Specifications

    • Monoposto built on a tubular frame with free-standing wheels
    • 2.5-litre V8 engine as a stressed member of the chassis
    • Two valves per cylinder controlled by two overhead camshafts
    • Dry sump oil lubrication
    • Mixture preparation with four Solex 40 PII double carburettors
    • Dual ignition (two plugs per cylinder)
    • Five-speed manual gearbox installed behind the driver
    • Triangular front axle with shock absorbers, front suspension with wishbones, transverse leaf spring, all made of metal
    • Rear suspension with De-Dion-tube, transverse leaf spring, pushrods and friction dampers, all made of metal

    Bore x stroke:             76 x 68.5 mm

    Displacement:           2,486 cc

    Maximum output:      265 HP at 8,000 rpm

    Top speed:                 300 Km/h (depending on ratio)

    Wheelbase:               2,280 mm

    Track front/rear:         1,270 / 1,270 mm

    Total length:               3, 850 mm

    Total width:                1,448 mm

    Total height:               962 mm

    Curb weight:              640 kg

     


  • Capsssssture

    1:18 CMC – 1937-1939 “Memory Edition” Talbot Lago Coupe T150 C-SS in Aubergine

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    $799.95

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    Model Description:

    • Memory edition in Aubergine
    • 1:18 Scale Model Crafted in Diecast Metal
    • Produced in usual high quality by CMC
    • Aesthetic “teardrop” bodywork
    • Delivery expected late September
    • Item #M-179

     

    The Talbot Lago Coupe is a classic and deeply cherished car, which CMC has finally replicated into a stunning, sleek and smooth diecast model. The car’s body was made famous by French sheet metal cutters Figoni & Falashi, giving it a beautiful teardrop shape, something considered “state of the art” nowadays. First presented at the Paris Motor Show in 1937, the Talbot Coupe impressed all who saw it. The narrow front fender an chromium-plated exhaust piece blend harmoniously together, especially with the helping hand of the luxurious interior, created with artistic workmanship in wood and leather. A six-cylinder in-line engine can be seen under the bonnet of the Coupe, with either 140 horsepower or 160, depending on the make. Only 16 of these cars were built between 1937 and 1939, with no two being alike. Only four of them are still around today!

     

     


  • M-161

    1:18 CMC – Auto Union Type C #18 1936 Eifel Race

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    $549.95

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    • Limited Edition of 1500 pieces world-wide
    • Hand-assembled and made of 1203 parts
    • High quality Diecast, crafted in excellent detail by CMC
    • Item #M-161

    History

    This 1:18 Auto Union Type C #18 Eifel Race Winner has been hand-assembled, consists of 1203 parts and is made of high quality Diecast by CMC. It features a removable front, the engine hood has true rubber o-rings for locking the hooks, a movable windscreen, exact replication of 16-cylinder V-type engine, openable fuel tank cap, cockpit fitted with textile seats and “Rosemeyer steering wheel”, “Bernd” imprinted on the outside of the cockpit and impeccable paintwork.

    The original vehicle featured a 16 cylinder V-engine with 2 valves per cylinder (controlled by an overhead cam shaft), dry sump lubrication, roots compressor and is a single seater (monoposto) with free-standing wheels and a tubular frame.

    Following information courtesy of the CMC:

    On June 14th 1936, Auto Union sent its best driver Bernd Rosemeyer to compete in the famous Eifel race at the Nürburgring, driving an Auto Union Type C with starting #18. This event became one of the most memorable fog-races at the Nürburgring. It consisted of 10 laps for a total distance of 228 km. The race was dominated by three prominent drivers of the time from the very beginning. Leading the way was Rudolf Caracciola in a Mercedes W25, next came the veteran warrior Tazio Nuvolari in an Alfa Romeo P3, and behind him was Bernd Rosemeyer in a Type C. After the 3rd round Nuvolari surpassed Caracciola to take the lead. But Rosemeyer was catching up steadily. Following a shock absorber failure that forced Caracciola to retire, a thrilling duel for victory unfolded between Nuvolari and the daredevil Rosemeyer.

    True to his nickname, Rosemeyer endeavored to become the undisputed front-runner by the 7th round.  At a significant distance behind him was Nuvolari, running in the 2nd place. During the 8th round, however, something unforeseen happened. With the sudden descent of a heavy fog, the Nürburgring was enveloped in an impenetrable wall of mist. Visibility was reduced to less than 20 meters! And what did Rosemeyer do? This crazy guy kept going full speed ahead. With a seriously blurred vision, he had to rely on his route memory of the course, a 7th sense for orientation, and an undaunted spirit to win the race. A legend was born.

    Bernd Rosemeyer went down in racing history as the “Fog Master.” Auto Union was setting a new benchmark that put an end to the dominance of Mercedes Benz.


  • M-162 8

    1:18 CMC – Auto Union Type C #111 – 1937 Schauinsland Mountain Hill Climb Winner – Hans Stuck

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    $559.95

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    Item No. M-162
    Limited Edition 1500 Worldwide
    Please note : The model pictured is a prototype.

    HISTORIC DETAILS

    Hill climbs always offer a variety of exhilaration in motor sport. They had become very popular by the 30’s, thanks to an increasing number of Grand-Prix race cars getting involved. Befittingly Auto Union held a special position, as they had an extraordinary skilled driver Hans Stuck, who was acclaimed to be “King of the Mountains” owing to his numerous hill-climbing victories.

    The legendary hill-climb track at the Schauinsland Mountain near Freiburg was internationally famous. The first hill-climbing race took place there in 1925. In the following years the race grew to be an international competition, which often attracted more than 20,000 spectators during the golden era of the Schauinsland hill climbs in the 30’s.

    This was very true of the 13th Schauinsland hill climb during the Grand Prix of Germany; it took place on August 1st, 1937 and boasted a registration list of drivers from 10 different nations. Most noteworthy were the two top racing teams: Auto Union with Hans Stuck and Bernd Rosemayer and Mercedes-Benz with Rudolf Caracciola, Manfred von Brauchitsch and Hermann Lang. The race-track was 12km long, leading all the way to the top of Schauinsland Pass with 178 turns for drivers to negotiate and an ascent of 780 meters on slopes that could be 12˚ uphill.

    At the end of the race, Hans Stuck lived up to his nickname “King of the Mountains” and raced his Auto Union Type C with twin-tyre rear wheels and starting number 111 to be the winner by using one second less than his team mate Bernd Rosemayer. The latter was also on a Type C, but with single-tyre rear wheels. Mercedes-Benz didn’t have a chance that day. Rudolf Caracciola and Hermann Lang, each on a W125, finished 3rd and 4th.

    Back then the drive-axle was often fitted with twin tyres in order to improve the transmission of motor torque onto the road. This resulted in better traction and made it easier to control the veer-off forces in narrow hill curves. But ultimately, it was not only the engine power, but also the driving skills and, above all, the cornering technique of a pilot that were essential for winning the victory.

    This museum quality, hand-crafted piece of diecast metal precision model is a replica of Hans Stuck’s winning vehicle with starting number 111 and twin-tyre rear wheels.

    TECHNICAL DATA OF THE ORIGINAL VEHICLE:

    V16 engine with Roots compressor.

    Maximum output: 520 hp at 5000 rpm

    Displacement: 6005 ccm

    Top speed: approx. 340 km/h

    Wheel base: 2310 mm

    Total length: 3920 mm

     


  • 1:18 CMC - Ferrari 250 GTO - Silver 1:18 Scale Diecast Model Car M-152

    1:18 CMC – Ferrari 250 GTO – Blue

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    $749.95

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    DMCS are proud to offer this model for immediate delivery.

    CMC have done it again, showing that they produce some of the highest quality models in the world.

    Product number #M-152

    History of the real car:
    A total of 39 GTO cars were built, of which 3 copies with a four-liter engine.

    In March 1961, was nervous at Ferrari. Reason for this was the newly introduced Jaguar E-Type at the Geneva Motor Show. It was seen as a serious competitor and feared losing its supremacy in racing events.

    Enzo Ferrari acted immediately and commissioned Giotto Bizzarrini as a project to develop a new GT car. Bizzarrini served as an experimental vehicle of the tried and tested 250 GT / SWB. It was clear as unchanged as possible to accept the chassis at the same wheelbase of 2,400mm. Rear axle, body aerodynamics and center of gravity were particularly in focus and train were improved by train.

    The new GTO was introduced in February 1962 with a phenomenal beautiful become body in the world press in Maranello.

    His first race was in 1962 at the 12-hour race at Sebring / USA in which the driver duo Phil Hill and Olivier Gendebien equal with a victory in the GT class and could come up second overall of the entire field of participants. Henceforth, it was all up; 1962 in 1963 and 1964, Ferrari was able to secure the GTO brand World Cup.

     

     


  • CMC Diecast Model Car - 1.87 - Ferrari Dino 156 F1 - 1961

    1:87 CMC – Ferrari Dino 156 F1 – 1961

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    $49.95 $34.95

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    This 1:87 Ferrari Model is Produced by CMC in polished alloy metal,

    CMC known for their extremely high quality and detailing.

    This Exclusive Ferrari Dino 156 F1, is a Limited edition Numbered 1341 of 5,000 Produced.

    Coming in at less than 5cm long this is a steal for a CMC Brand model at under $50

    This model is also featured in Issue 15 of the Diecast Magazine on Page 72

    A Fantastic Model, brought to you from a great brand in a scale that is uncommon in Australia making for a great point of difference to any collection or for the collector that values CMC's quality model production but looking for one at a more affordable price of under $50.00